Fossetcon 2014

Elizabeth Krumbach - Wed, 2014-09-17 00:44

As I wrote in my last post I attended Fossetcon this past weekend. The core of the event kicked off on Friday with a keynote by Iris Gardner on how Diversity Creates Innovation and the work that the CODE2040 organization is doing to help talented minorities succeed in technology. I first heard about this organization back in 2013 at OSCON, so it was great to hear more about their recent successes with their summer Fellows Program. It was also great to hear that their criteria for talent not only included coding skills, but also sought out a passion for engineering and leadership skills.

After a break, I went to see PJ Hagerty give his talk, Meetup Groups: Act Locally – Think Globally. I’ve been running open source related groups for over a decade, so I’ve been in this space for quite a long time and was hoping to get some new tips, PJ didn’t disappoint! He led off with the need to break out of the small “pizza and a presentation by a regular” grind, which is indeed important to growing a group and making people show up. Some of his suggestions for doing this included:

  • Seek out students to attend and participate in the group, they can be some of your most motivated attendees and will bring friends
  • Seek out experienced programmers (and technologists) not necessarily in your specific field to give more agnostic talks about general programming/tech practices
  • Do cross-technology meetups – a PHP and Ruby night! Maybe Linux and BSD?
  • Bring in guest speakers from out of town (if they’re close enough, many will come for the price of gas and/or train/bus ticket – I would!)
  • Send members to regional conferences… or run your own conference
  • Get kids involved
  • Host an OpenHack event

I’ll have to see what my co-conspiratorsorganizers at some local groups think of these ideas, it certainly would be fun to spice up some of the groups I regularly attend.

From there I went to MySQL Server Performance Tuning 101 by Ligaya Turmelle. Her talk centered around the fact that MySQL tuning is not simple, but went through a variety of mechanisms to tune it in different ways for specific cases you may run into. Perhaps most useful to me were her tips for gathering usage statistics from MySQL, I was unfamiliar with many of the metrics she pulled out. Very cool stuff.

After lunch and some booth duty, I headed over to Crash Course in Open Source Cloud Computing presented by Mark Hinkle. Now, I work on OpenStack (referred to as the “Boy Band” of cloud infrastructures in the talk – hah!), so my view of the cloud world is certainly influenced by that perspective. It was great to see a whirlwind tour of other and related technologies in the open source ecosystem.

The closing keynote for the day was by Deb Nicholson, Style or substance? Free Software is Totally the 80’s. She gave a bit of a history of free software and speculated as to whether our movement would be characterized by a shallow portrayal of “unconferences and penguin swag” (like 80s neon clothes and extravagance) or how free software communities are changing the world (like groups in the 80s who were really seeking social change or the fall of the Berlin wall). Her hope is that by stepping back and taking a look at our community that perhaps we could shape how our movement is remembered and focus on what is important to our future.

Saturday I had more booth duty with my colleague Yolanda Robla who came in from Spain to do a talk on Continuous integration automation. We were joined by another colleague from HP, Mark Atwood, who dropped by the conference for his talk How to Get One of These Awesome Open Source Jobs – one of my favorites.

The opening keynote on Saturday was Considering the Future of Copyleft by Bradley Kuhn. I always enjoy going to his talks because I’m considerably more optimistic about the health and future of free software, so his strong copyleft stance makes me stop and consider where I truly stand and what that means. He worries that an ecosystem of permissive licenses (like Apache, MIT, BSD) will lead to companies doing the least possible for free software and keeping all their secret sauces secret, diluting the ecosystem and making it less valuable for future consumers of free software since they’ll need the proprietary components. I’m more hopeful than that, particularly as I see real free software folks starting to get jobs in major companies and staying true to their free software roots. Indeed, these days I spend a vast majority of my time working on Apache-licensed software for a large company who pays me to do the work. Slides from his talk are here, I highly recommend having a browse: http://ebb.org/bkuhn/talks/FOSSETCON-2014/copyleft-future.html

After some more boothing, I headed over to Apache Mesos and Aurora, An Operating System For The Datacenter by David Lester. Again, being on the OpenStack bandwagon these past few years I haven’t had a lot of time to explore the ecosystem elsewhere, and I learned that this is some pretty cool stuff! Lester works for Twitter and talked some about how Twitter and other companies in the community are using both the Mesos and Aurora tools to build their efficient, fault tolerant datacenters and how it’s lead to impressive improvements in the reliability of their infrastructures. He also did a really great job explaining the concepts of both, hooray for diagrams. I kind of want to play with them now.

Introduction to The ELK Stack: Elasticsearch, Logstash & Kibana by Aaron Mildenstein was my next stop. We run an ELK stack in the OpenStack Infrastructure, but I’ve not been very involved in the management of that, instead focusing on how we’re using it in elastic-recheck so I hoped this talk would fill in some of the fundamentals for me. It did do that so I was happy with that, but I have to admit that I was pretty disappointed to see demos of plugins that required a paid license.

As the day wound down, I finally had my talk: Code Review for Systems Administrators.


Code Review for Sysadmins talk, thanks to Yolanda Robla for taking the photo

I love giving this talk. I’m really proud of the infrastructure that has been built for OpenStack and it’s one that I’m happy and excited to work with every day – in part because we do things through code review. Even better, my excitement during this presentation seemed contagious, with an audience that seemed really engaged with the topic and impressed. Huge thanks to everyone who came and particularly to those who asked questions and took time to chat with me after. Slides from my talk are available here: fossetcon-code-review-for-sysadmins/

And then we were at the end! The conference wrapped up with a closing keynote on Open Source Is More than Code by Jordan Sissel. I really loved this talk. I’ve known for some time that the logstash community was one of the friendlier ones, with their mantra of “If a newbie has a bad time, it’s a bug.” This talk dove further into that ethos in their community and how it’s impacted how members of the project handle unhappy users. He also talked about improvements made to documentation (both inline in code and formal documentation) and how they’ve tried to “break away from text” some and put more human interaction in their community so people don’t feel so isolated and dehumanized by a text only environment (though I do find this is where I’m personally most comfortable, not everyone feels that way). I hope more projects will look to the logstash community as a good example of how we all can do better, I know I have some work to do when it comes to support.

Thanks again to conference staff for making this event such a fun one, particularly as it was their first year!

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Global key bindings in Emacs

Akkana Peck - Sun, 2014-09-14 22:46

Global key bindings in emacs. What's hard about that, right? Just something simple like (global-set-key "\C-m" 'newline-and-indent) and you're all set.

Well, no. global-set-key gives you a nice key binding that works ... until the next time you load a mode that wants to redefine that key binding out from under you.

For many years I've had a huge collection of mode hooks that run when specific modes load. For instance, python-mode defines \C-c\C-r, my binding that normally runs revert-buffer, to do something called run-python. I never need to run python inside emacs -- I do that in a shell window. But I fairly frequently want to revert a python file back to the last version I saved. So I had a hook that ran whenever python-mode loaded to override that key binding and set it back to what I'd already set it to: (defun reset-revert-buffer () (define-key python-mode-map "\C-c\C-r" 'revert-buffer) ) (setq python-mode-hook 'reset-revert-buffer)

That worked fine -- but you have to do it for every mode that overrides key bindings and every binding that gets overridden. It's a constant chase, where you keep needing to stop editing whatever you wanted to edit and go add yet another mode-hook to .emacs after chasing down which mode is causing the problem. There must be a better solution.

A web search quickly led me to the StackOverflow discussion Globally override key bindings. I tried the techniques there; but they didn't work.

It took a lot of help from the kind folks on #emacs, but after an hour or so they finally found the key: emulation-mode-map-alists. It's only barely documented -- the key there is "The “active” keymaps in each alist are used before minor-mode-map-alist and minor-mode-overriding-map-alist" -- and there seem to be no examples anywhere on the web for how to use it. It's a list of alists mapping names to keymaps. Oh, clears it right up! Right?

Okay, here's what it means. First you define a new keymap and add your bindings to it: (defvar global-keys-minor-mode-map (make-sparse-keymap) "global-keys-minor-mode keymap.") (define-key global-keys-minor-mode-map "\C-c\C-r" 'revert-buffer) (define-key global-keys-minor-mode-map (kbd "C-;") 'insert-date)

Now define a minor mode that will use that keymap. You'll use that minor mode for basically everything. (define-minor-mode global-keys-minor-mode "A minor mode so that global key settings override annoying major modes." t "global-keys" 'global-keys-minor-mode-map) (global-keys-minor-mode 1)

Now build an alist consisting of a list containing a single dotted pair: the name of the minor mode and the keymap. ;; A keymap that's supposed to be consulted before the first ;; minor-mode-map-alist. (defconst global-minor-mode-alist (list (cons 'global-keys-minor-mode global-keys-minor-mode-map)))

Finally, set emulation-mode-map-alists to a list containing only the global-minor-mode-alist. (setf emulation-mode-map-alists '(global-minor-mode-alist))

There's one final step. Even though you want these bindings to be global and work everywhere, there is one place where you might not want them: the minibuffer. To be honest, I'm not sure if this part is necessary, but it sounds like a good idea so I've kept it. (defun my-minibuffer-setup-hook () (global-keys-minor-mode 0)) (add-hook 'minibuffer-setup-hook 'my-minibuffer-setup-hook)

Whew! It's a lot of work, but it'll let me clean up my .emacs file and save me from endlessly adding new mode-hooks.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Bash Arrays

Renata - Wed, 2014-08-27 17:47

Arrays are helpful, and I’ll give some examples for reference. They can be a little bit confusing, but once you get used to them, it’s easy!

First you initialize the arrays

cat[1]="Bub"
cat[2]="Grumpy"
cat[3]="Luna"

feat[1]="cute"
feat[2]="terrible"
feat[3]="fashion"

Then you use them as you wish. You can, at first, just list them individually

echo "${cat[3]} is ${feat[1]}"

or list all of the items in a specific array
echo “Cats I like: ${cat[@]}”

Something like that would also work:

for i in {1..3}
do
echo "${cat[i]} is ${feat[i]}!"
done

That opens many possibilities. Life is not only about internet cats (although it sometimes seems so).

Make good use of your arrays, they’re great!

(I takes me 8 months to update the site and I write a silly post about bash arrays, I know. Sorry, I was thinking about them.)

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Ditch Agile, Go With Common Sense

L J Laubenheimer (Iconoclast Blast) - Tue, 2014-07-15 17:40
I am so sick of Agile I could puke. Agile "methods" and "processes" are often used as a bludgeon to enforce the great speedup, doing more, faster, with fewer resources. I see estimations forced into the PM or manager's demanded hard deadline, hours getting longer because of wasted time in meetings, and "rapid" deployment of garbage code that needs to be rolled back because no integration testing was done (eliminating QA does that to you.)
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

How To ***REALLY*** Advocate for the Customer

L J Laubenheimer (Iconoclast Blast) - Tue, 2014-07-15 17:32
I occasionally see job ads for "customer advocates" or "customer evangelists". They all turn out to be sales and marketing, that is, advocating or evangelizing stuff to the would-be user. That is so ass-backwards that it makes me foam at the mouth.
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

SCaLE 12x Pics From Around the Web!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Los Angeles Chapter - Fri, 2014-03-14 23:14
The Tres Chix rocked it @ SCaLE 12x!!!!

The Tres Chix rocked it @ SCaLE 12x!!!!
Picture From the SCALE 12x Official Pics Site
https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=scale12x&s=rec

We won!!!! by Phillip Banks!

We won “Biggest SCaLE Spirit” and “Best Crowd Pleaser” Awards @ SCaLE 12x!  We won!  We won!!  We won!!!
Picture by Phillip Banks

And we got our own hashtag on Instagram thanks to TrueAbility!

Thomas Stocking ‏@ThomasStocking Feb 22 Expo has plenty of life for open source software geeks like me at #scale12x pic.twitter.com/3pXObnsF6p

Thomas Stocking ‏@ThomasStocking Feb 22
Expo has plenty of life for open source software geeks like me at #scale12x pic.twitter.com/3pXObnsF6p

 

A penguin on the loose at #scale12x pic.twitter.com/1Djo0ckPy3

A penguin on the loose at #scale12x pic.twitter.com/1Djo0ckPy3

 

randalschwartz 3 weeks ago · SCaLE 12x Audience for my talk at #scale12x

Audience for my talk at #scale12x
randal-schwartz

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

#New project problems

Brianna Laugher - Sat, 2014-02-22 23:21

I-know-how-to-program wankery (get to the content already)

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

New project: Crowdfunded Free Software (CFFSW)

Brianna Laugher - Wed, 2014-02-19 12:27

The launch of a new blog, which aims to chronicle crowdfunding campaigns for free software and related endeavours.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Some Newsblur fangirling

Brianna Laugher - Tue, 2014-02-11 06:19

Notes on customising your Newsblur shared items page, intelligence training and the Android app.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

What will we count?

What Will We Use? (Maco and Bethlynn) - Wed, 2012-03-21 18:39

Hello Readers…

This blog has been about Microsoft and its market share.

Specifically, on June 2009 I bet my friend Nick that Microsoft would lack a majority market share come June 2011. We discussed the three products that HAD the majority market share as of the summer of 2009:

  1. Microsoft Internet Explorer for browsers
  2. Microsoft Office for office suites
  3. Microsoft Windows for operating systems

Due to personal reasons, we did not conclude this project properly.

It was too time intensive to research the true market share of Microsoft products. It is without question that Microsoft no longer holds the majority market share on browsers, now with about 30% of the market share. The office suite question is still under debate due to Google Apps. Also under consideration is if tablets replace the desktop.

In summary, the question all along should have been “What will we count?” as office suites and operating system platforms instead of “What will we use?”

Without question, Microsoft is struggling to stay relevant as revenues plummet. Indeed, upon 2011 year close Microsoft is a different company. It is sad. I do not want Microsoft to fold. Competition is good even for the Apple and Linux-based products I prefer using.

After-all, I am a MSFT stock-holder.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Ramadan Mubarak

Lilandra - Sat, 2011-08-13 05:10

Ramadan is here again. Actually we are about 13 days in…so almost half way done.

And you’re wondering what could I possibly doing that is new, right?
More pictures of dates and fried stuff?
An artistic shot of a glass of water?

Well I intend to host my very first Iftar.

I’m going to give people food to break fast.

Now my mom is not very happy about this.
She may not like the menu either.

But I had a plan…for how I could cook everything…bake bake bake…I really need a second oven…

However I was saved. I am outsourcing the meat and one side.

I am making one side and salad (well I informed my sister in law that she is making the salad).

I’m excited and petrified at the same time.

Wsh me luck!

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Transmissions from 2011-06-26

Teri Solow - Sun, 2011-06-26 12:50
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

gothiccharmschool: I don’t care if Monday’s blueTuesday’s gray…

Teri Solow - Sat, 2011-06-25 21:00

gothiccharmschool:

I don’t care if Monday’s blue
Tuesday’s gray and Wednesday too
Thursday I don’t care about you
It’s Friday, I’m in love

Monday you can fall apart
Tuesday, Wednesday break my heart
Oh, Thursday doesn’t even start
It’s Friday I’m in love

I don’t care if Mondays black
Tuesday, Wednesday – heart attack
Thursday, never looking back
It’s Friday, I’m in love

Monday, you can hold your head
Tuesday, Wednesday stay in bed
Or Thursday – watch the walls instead
It’s Friday, I’m in love

Via l0vechild

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Transmissions from 2011-06-25

Teri Solow - Sat, 2011-06-25 12:50
  • One placeholder sentence to replace and I guess I'm ready to figure out this deploy. But, oh, what a sentence. #
  • @travisezell Oh man, he had such a cute little website and now it's contemplating sympathy death. http://bit.ly/kXiWQu in reply to travisezell #
  • Procrastination is a muse and the paradox. @ Reed College – Educational Technology Center http://instagr.am/p/GTxqY/ #
  • Taking my cats to the vet just now was my $500 nam. Seriously, the wisdom tooth extraction Monday was way cheaper and slightly more pleasant #
  • To be clear, the vets were great. It was the screaming murderous cats which were the problem. #
  • @palomint You're supposed to tell us. in reply to palomint #
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Transmissions from 2011-06-24

Teri Solow - Sat, 2011-06-25 05:50
  • One placeholder sentence to replace and I guess I'm ready to figure out this deploy. But, oh, what a sentence. #
  • @travisezell Oh man, he had such a cute little website and now it's contemplating sympathy death. http://bit.ly/kXiWQu in reply to travisezell #
  • Procrastination is a muse and the paradox. @ Reed College – Educational Technology Center http://instagr.am/p/GTxqY/ #
  • Taking my cats to the vet just now was my $500 nam. Seriously, the wisdom tooth extraction Monday was way cheaper and slightly more pleasant #
  • To be clear, the vets were great. It was the screaming murderous cats which were the problem. #
  • @palomint You're supposed to tell us. in reply to palomint #
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Procrastination is a muse and the paradox. (Taken with…

Teri Solow - Fri, 2011-06-24 20:16

Procrastination is a muse and the paradox. (Taken with Instagram at Reed College – Educational Technology Center)

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Transmissions from 2011-06-23

Teri Solow - Fri, 2011-06-24 05:50
  • Wondering how many apps I have installed on my phone came bundled with wee web browsers. Guessing 50%. Seems massively wasteful. #
  • @micahjgates It's mostly wasteful in that it wastes my time making me re-login to various places every time I leave a comment or whatever in reply to micahjgates #
  • @darkuncle Instapaper, facebook, tumblr, and others all have their own tiny non-safari browsers. in reply to darkuncle #
  • @ahockley You din't think they already have access to everything you have in the cloud? in reply to ahockley #
  • Kid, to other kid who just walked past me: "Dude, you really shouldn't be ahead of us like that! You might get kidnapped!" #
  • Store! Y U no have creamer?! #
  • Looking down, you realize that most people consider tiny stars entirely disposable. #
  • Video: This really drives home what an amazing song this is. It literally gave me chills. (via 35 YouTube… http://tumblr.com/xp7350z70o #
  • Photo: Living on the edge. http://tumblr.com/xp7353rvk6 #
  • @darkuncle @marco Maybe it's based on safari, I don't know. Since it doesn't use safari's cookies it makes no difference to me. in reply to darkuncle #
  • Watching some awful little songbirds attack a sickly crow :( #
  • A second crow came to the defense of the first. I hope they eat all the songbird's babies. #
  • Good samaritans are my kryptonite. If someone dropped something, LEAVE IT ALONE kthxbai. #
  • @darkuncle Who cares how it's implemented then? A separate cookie jar means it's less useful than if it just used safari. in reply to darkuncle #
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Living on the edge.

Teri Solow - Thu, 2011-06-23 21:02

Living on the edge.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers
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