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Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing and Technology, Science, and Nature.
Updated: 7 hours 27 min ago

A good week for critters

Thu, 2015-07-30 17:07

It's been a good week for unusual wildlife.

[Myotis bat hanging just outside the front door] We got a surprise a few nights ago when flipping the porch light on to take the trash out: a bat was clinging to the wall just outside the front door.

It was tiny, and very calm -- so motionless we feared it was dead. (I took advantage of this to run inside and grab the camera.) It didn't move at all while we were there. The trash mission accomplished, we turned out the light and left the bat alone. Happily, it wasn't ill or dead: it was gone a few hours later.

We see bats fairly regularly flying back and forth across the patio early on summer evenings -- insects are apparently attracted to the light visible through the windows from inside, and the bats follow the insects. But this was the first close look I'd had at a stationary bat, and my first chance to photograph one.

I'm not completely sure what sort of bat it is: almost certainly some species of Myotis (mouse-eared bats), and most likely M. yumanensis, the "little brown bat". It's hard to be sure, though, as there are at least six species of Myotis known in the area.

[Woodrat released from trap] We've had several woodrats recently try to set up house near the house or the engine compartment of our Rav4, so we've been setting traps regularly. Though woodrats are usually nocturnal, we caught one in broad daylight as it explored the area around our garden pond.

But the small patio outside the den seems to be a particular draw for them, maybe because it has a wooden deck with a nice dark space under it for a rat to hide. We have one who's been leaving offerings -- pine cones, twigs, leaves -- just outside the door (and less charming rat droppings nearby), so one night Dave set three traps all on that deck. I heard one trap clank shut in the middle of the night, but when I checked in the morning, two traps were sprung without any occupants and the third was still open.

But later that morning, I heard rattling from outside the door. Sure enough, the third trap was occupied and the occupant was darting between one end and the other, trying to get out. I told Dave we'd caught the rat, and we prepared to drive it out to the parkland where we've been releasing them.

[chipmunk caught in our rat trap] And then I picked up the trap, looked in -- and discovered it was a pretty funny looking woodrat. With a furry tail and stripes. A chipmunk! We've been so envious of the folks who live out on the canyon rim and are overloaded with chipmunks ... this is only the second time we've seen here, and now it's probably too spooked to stick around.

We released it near the woodpile, but it ran off away from the house. Our only hope for its return is that it remembers the nice peanut butter snack it got here.

[Baby Great Plains skink] Later that day, we were on our way out the door, late for a meeting, when I spotted a small lizard in the den. (How did it get in?) Fast and lithe and purple-tailed, it skittered under the sofa as soon as it saw us heading its way.

But the den is a small room and the lizard had nowhere to go. After upending the sofa and moving a couple of tables, we cornered it by the door, and I was able to trap it in my hands without any damage to its tail.

When I let it go on the rocks outside, it calmed down immediately, giving me time to run for the camera. Its gorgeous purple tail doesn't show very well, but at least the photo was good enough to identify it as a juvenile Great Plains skink. The adults look more like Jabba the Hut nothing like the lovely little juvenile we saw. We actually saw an adult this spring (outside), when we were clearing out a thick weed patch and disturbed a skink from its hibernation. And how did this poor lizard get saddled with a scientfic name of Eumeces obsoletus?

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Trackpad workarounds: using function keys as mouse buttons

Mon, 2015-07-27 02:54

I've had no end of trouble with my Asus 1015E's trackpad. A discussion of laptops on a mailing list -- in particular, someone's concerns that the nifty-looking Dell XPS 13, which is available preloaded with Linux, has had reviewers say that the trackpad doesn't work well -- reminded me that I'd never posted my final solution.

The Asus's trackpad has two problems. First, it's super sensitive to taps, so if any part of my hand gets anywhere near the trackpad while I'm typing, suddenly it sees a mouse click at some random point on the screen, and instead of typing into an emacs window suddenly I find I'm typing into a live IRC client. Or, worse, instead of typing my password into a password field, I'm typing it into IRC. That wouldn't have been so bad on the old style of trackpad, where I could just turn off taps altogether and use the hardware buttons; this is one of those new-style trackpads that doesn't have any actual buttons.

Second, two-finger taps don't work. Three-finger taps work just fine, but two-finger taps: well, I found when I wanted a right-click (which is what two-fingers was set up to do), I had to go TAP, TAP, TAP, TAP maybe ten or fifteen times before one of them would finally take. But by the time the menu came up, of course, I'd done another tap and that canceled the menu and I had to start over. Infuriating!

I struggled for many months with synclient's settings for tap sensitivity and right and left click emulation. I tried enabling syndaemon, which is supposed to disable clicks as long as you're typing then enable them again afterward, and spent months playing with its settings, but in order to get it to work at all, I had to set the timeout so long that there was an infuriating wait after I stopped typing before I could do anything.

I was on the verge of giving up on the Asus and going back to my Dell Latitude 2120, which had an excellent trackpad (with buttons) and the world's greatest 10" laptop keyboard. (What the Dell doesn't have is battery life, and I really hated to give up the Asus's light weight and 8-hour battery life.) As a final, desperate option, I decided to disable taps completely.

Disable taps? Then how do you do a mouse click?

I theorized, with all Linux's flexibility, there must be some way to get function keys to work like mouse buttons. And indeed there is. The easiest way seemed to be to use xmodmap (strange to find xmodmap being the simplest anything, but there you go). It turns out that a simple line like xmodmap -e "keysym F1 = Pointer_Button1" is most of what you need. But to make it work, you need to enable "mouse keys": xkbset m

But for reasons unknown, mouse keys will expire after some set timeout unless you explicitly tell it not to. Do that like this: xkbset exp =m

Once that's all set up, you can disable single-finger taps with synclient: synclient TapButton1=0 Of course, you can disable 2-finger and 3-finger taps by setting them to 0 as well. I don't generally find them a problem (they don't work reliably, but they don't fire on their own either), so I left them enabled.

I tried it and it worked beautifully for left click. Since I was still having trouble with that two-finger tap for right click, I put that on a function key too, and added middle click while I was at it. I don't use function keys much, so devoting three function keys to mouse buttons wasn't really a problem.

In fact, it worked so well that I decided it would be handy to have an additional set of mouse keys over on the other side of the keyboard, to make it easy to do mouse clicks with either hand. So I defined F1, F2 and F3 as one set of mouse buttons, and F10, F11 and F12 as another.

And yes, this all probably sounds nutty as heck. But it really is a nice laptop aside from the trackpad from hell; and although I thought Fn-key mouse buttons would be highly inconvenient, it took surprisingly little time to get used to them.

So this is what I ended up putting in .config/openbox/autostart file. I wrap it in a test for hostname, since I like to be able to use the same configuration file on multiple machines, but I don't need this hack on any machine but the Asus. if [ $(hostname) == iridum ]; then synclient TapButton1=0 TapButton2=3 TapButton3=2 HorizEdgeScroll=1 xmodmap -e "keysym F1 = Pointer_Button1" xmodmap -e "keysym F2 = Pointer_Button2" xmodmap -e "keysym F3 = Pointer_Button3" xmodmap -e "keysym F10 = Pointer_Button1" xmodmap -e "keysym F11 = Pointer_Button2" xmodmap -e "keysym F12 = Pointer_Button3" xkbset m xkbset exp =m else synclient TapButton1=1 TapButton2=3 TapButton3=2 HorizEdgeScroll=1 fi

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Plugging in those darned USB cables

Mon, 2015-07-20 02:37

I'm sure I'm not the only one who's forever trying to plug in a USB cable only to find it upside down. And then I flip it and try it the other way, and that doesn't work either, so I go back to the first side, until I finally get it plugged in, because there's no easy way to tell visually which way the plug is supposed to go.

It's true of nearly all of the umpteen variants of USB plug: almost all of them differ only subtly from the top side to the bottom.

[USB trident] And to "fix" this, USB cables are built so that they have subtly raised indentations which, if you hold them to the light just right so you can see the shadows, say "USB" or have the little USB trident on the top side:


In an art store a few weeks ago, Dave had a good idea.

[USB cables painted for orientation] He bought a white paint marker, and we've used it to paint the logo side of all our USB cables.

Tape the cables down on the desk -- so they don't flop around while the paint is drying -- and apply a few dabs of white paint to the logo area of each connector. If you're careful you might be able to fill in the lowered part so the raised USB symbol stays black; or to paint only the raised USB part. I tried that on a few cables, but after the fifth or so cable I stopped worrying about whether I was ending up with a pretty USB symbol and just started dabbing paint wherever was handy.

The paint really does make a big difference. It's much easier now to plug in USB cables, especially micro USB, and I never go through that "flip it over several times" dance any more.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers