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Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing and Technology, Science, and Nature.
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Mirror, mirror

20 hours 47 min ago

A female hummingbird -- probably a black-chinned -- hanging out at our window feeder on a cool cloudy morning.

[female hummingbird at the window feeder]

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Global key bindings in Emacs

Sun, 2014-09-14 22:46

Global key bindings in emacs. What's hard about that, right? Just something simple like (global-set-key "\C-m" 'newline-and-indent) and you're all set.

Well, no. global-set-key gives you a nice key binding that works ... until the next time you load a mode that wants to redefine that key binding out from under you.

For many years I've had a huge collection of mode hooks that run when specific modes load. For instance, python-mode defines \C-c\C-r, my binding that normally runs revert-buffer, to do something called run-python. I never need to run python inside emacs -- I do that in a shell window. But I fairly frequently want to revert a python file back to the last version I saved. So I had a hook that ran whenever python-mode loaded to override that key binding and set it back to what I'd already set it to: (defun reset-revert-buffer () (define-key python-mode-map "\C-c\C-r" 'revert-buffer) ) (setq python-mode-hook 'reset-revert-buffer)

That worked fine -- but you have to do it for every mode that overrides key bindings and every binding that gets overridden. It's a constant chase, where you keep needing to stop editing whatever you wanted to edit and go add yet another mode-hook to .emacs after chasing down which mode is causing the problem. There must be a better solution.

A web search quickly led me to the StackOverflow discussion Globally override key bindings. I tried the techniques there; but they didn't work.

It took a lot of help from the kind folks on #emacs, but after an hour or so they finally found the key: emulation-mode-map-alists. It's only barely documented -- the key there is "The “active” keymaps in each alist are used before minor-mode-map-alist and minor-mode-overriding-map-alist" -- and there seem to be no examples anywhere on the web for how to use it. It's a list of alists mapping names to keymaps. Oh, clears it right up! Right?

Okay, here's what it means. First you define a new keymap and add your bindings to it: (defvar global-keys-minor-mode-map (make-sparse-keymap) "global-keys-minor-mode keymap.") (define-key global-keys-minor-mode-map "\C-c\C-r" 'revert-buffer) (define-key global-keys-minor-mode-map (kbd "C-;") 'insert-date)

Now define a minor mode that will use that keymap. You'll use that minor mode for basically everything. (define-minor-mode global-keys-minor-mode "A minor mode so that global key settings override annoying major modes." t "global-keys" 'global-keys-minor-mode-map) (global-keys-minor-mode 1)

Now build an alist consisting of a list containing a single dotted pair: the name of the minor mode and the keymap. ;; A keymap that's supposed to be consulted before the first ;; minor-mode-map-alist. (defconst global-minor-mode-alist (list (cons 'global-keys-minor-mode global-keys-minor-mode-map)))

Finally, set emulation-mode-map-alists to a list containing only the global-minor-mode-alist. (setf emulation-mode-map-alists '(global-minor-mode-alist))

There's one final step. Even though you want these bindings to be global and work everywhere, there is one place where you might not want them: the minibuffer. To be honest, I'm not sure if this part is necessary, but it sounds like a good idea so I've kept it. (defun my-minibuffer-setup-hook () (global-keys-minor-mode 0)) (add-hook 'minibuffer-setup-hook 'my-minibuffer-setup-hook)

Whew! It's a lot of work, but it'll let me clean up my .emacs file and save me from endlessly adding new mode-hooks.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Making emailed LinkedIn discussion thread links actually work

Thu, 2014-09-11 19:10

I don't use web forums, the kind you have to read online, because they don't scale. If you're only interested in one subject, then they work fine: you can keep a browser tab for your one or two web forums perenially open and hit reload every few hours to see what's new. If you're interested in twelve subjects, each of which has several different web forums devoted to it -- how could you possibly keep up with that? So I don't bother with forums unless they offer an email gateway, so they'll notify me by email when new discussions get started, without my needing to check all those web pages several times per day.

LinkedIn discussions mostly work like a web forum. But for a while, they had a reasonably usable email gateway. You could set a preference to be notified of each new conversation. You still had to click on the web link to read the conversation so far, but if you posted something, you'd get the rest of the discussion emailed to you as each message was posted. Not quite as good as a regular mailing list, but it worked pretty well. I used it for several years to keep up with the very active Toastmasters group discussions.

About a year ago, something broke in their software, and they lost the ability to send email for new conversations. I filed a trouble ticket, and got a note saying they were aware of the problem and working on it. I followed up three months later (by filing another ticket -- there's no way to add to an existing one) and got a response saying be patient, they were still working on it. 11 months later, I'm still being patient, but it's pretty clear they have no intention of ever fixing the problem.

Just recently I fiddled with something in my LinkedIn prefs, and started getting "Popular Discussions" emails every day or so. The featured "popular discussion" is always something stupid that I have no interest in, but it's followed by a section headed "Other Popular Discussions" that at least gives me some idea what's been posted in the last few days. Seemed like it might be worth clicking on the links even though it means I'd always be a few days late responding to any conversations.

Except -- none of the links work. They all go to a generic page with a red header saying "Sorry it seems there was a problem with the link you followed."

I'm reading the plaintext version of the mail they send out. I tried viewing the HTML part of the mail in a browser, and sure enough, those links worked. So I tried comparing the text links with the HTML: Text version: http://www.linkedin.com/e/v2?e=3x1l-hzwzd1q8-6f&t=gde&midToken=AQEqep2nxSZJIg&ek=b2_anet_digest&li=82&m=group_discussions&ts=textdisc-6&itemID=5914453683503906819&itemType=member&anetID=98449 HTML version: http://www.linkedin.com/e/v2?e=3x1l-hzwzd1q8-6f&t=gde&midToken=AQEqep2nxSZJIg&ek=b2_anet_digest&li=17&m=group_discussions&ts=grouppost-disc-6&itemID=5914453683503906819&itemType=member&anetID=98449

Well, that's clear as mud, isn't it? HTML entity substitution

I pasted both links one on top of each other, to make it easier to compare them one at a time. That made it fairly easy to find the first difference: Text version: http://www.linkedin.com/e/v2?e=3x1l-hzwzd1q8-6f&t=gde&midToken= ... HTML version: http://www.linkedin.com/e/v2?e=3x1l-hzwzd1q8-6f&t=gde&midToken= ...

Time to die laughing: they're doing HTML entity substitution on the plaintext part of their email notifications, changing & to & everywhere in the link.

If you take the link from the text email and replace & with &, the link works, and takes you to the specific discussion. Pagination

Except you can't actually read the discussion. I went to a discussion that had been open for 2 days and had 35 responses, and LinkedIn only showed four of them. I don't even know which four they are -- are they the first four, the last four, or some Facebook-style "four responses we thought you'd like". There's a button to click on to show the most recent entries, but then I only see a few of the most recent responses, still not the whole thread.

Hooray for the web -- of course, plenty of other people have had this problem too, and a little web searching unveiled a solution. Add a pagination token to the end of the URL that tells LinkedIn to show 1000 messages at once. &count=1000&paginationToken= It won't actually show 1000 (or all) responses -- but if you start at the beginning of the page and scroll down reading responses one by one, it will auto-load new batches. Yes, infinite scrolling pages can be annoying, but at least it's a way to read a LinkedIn conversation in order. Making it automatic

Okay, now I know how to edit one of their URLs to make it work. Do I want to do that by hand any time I want to view a discussion? Noooo!

Time for a script! Since I'll be selecting the URLs from mutt, they'll be in the X PRIMARY clipboard. And unfortunately, mutt adds newlines so I might as well strip those as well as fixing the LinkedIn problems. (Firefox will strip newlines for me when I paste in a multi-line URL, but why rely on that?)

Here's the important part of the script: import subprocess, gtk primary = gtk.clipboard_get(gtk.gdk.SELECTION_PRIMARY) if not primary.wait_is_text_available() : sys.exit(0) link = primary.wait_for_text() link = link.replace("\n", "").replace("&", "&") + \ "&count=1000&paginationToken=" subprocess.call(["firefox", "-new-tab", link])

And here's the full script: linkedinify on GitHub. I also added it to pyclip, the script I call from Openbox to open a URL in Firefox when I middle-click on the desktop.

Now I can finally go back to participating in those discussions.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Dot Reminders

Mon, 2014-09-08 03:10

I read about cool computer tricks all the time. I think "Wow, that would be a real timesaver!" And then a week later, when it actually would save me time, I've long since forgotten all about it.

After yet another session where I wanted to open a frequently opened file in emacs and thought "I think I made a bookmark for that a while back", but then decided it's easier to type the whole long pathname rather than go re-learn how to use emacs bookmarks, I finally decided I needed a reminder system -- something that would poke me and remind me of a few things I want to learn.

I used to keep cheat sheets and quick reference cards on my desk; but that never worked for me. Quick reference cards tend to be 50 things I already know, 40 things I'll never care about and 4 really great things I should try to remember. And eventually they get burned in a pile of other papers on my desk and I never see them again.

My new system is working much better. I created a file in my home directory called .reminders, in which I put a few -- just a few -- things I want to learn and start using regularly. It started out at about 6 lines but now it's grown to 12.

Then I put this in my .zlogin (of course, you can do this for any shell, not just zsh, though the syntax may vary): if [[ -f ~/.reminders ]]; then cat ~/.reminders fi

Now, in every login shell (which for me is each new terminal window I create on my desktop), I see my reminders. Of course, I don't read them every time; but I look at them often enough that I can't forget the existence of great things like emacs bookmarks, or diff <(cmd1) <(cmd2).

And if I forget the exact keystroke or syntax, I can always cat ~/.reminders to remind myself. And after a few weeks of regular use, I finally have internalized some of these tricks, and can remove them from my .reminders file.

It's not just for tech tips, either; I've used a similar technique for reminding myself of hard-to-remember vocabulary words when I was studying Spanish. It could work for anything you want to teach yourself.

Although the details of my .reminders are specific to Linux/Unix and zsh, of course you could use a similar system on any computer. If you don't open new terminal windows, you can set a reminder to pop up when you first log in, or once a day, or whatever is right for you. The important part is to have a small set of tips that you see regularly.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers