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join the fight for racial justice!

Wed, 2015-06-24 00:42
Notice: this post contains a lot of important links. If you are seeing a link-stripped version, e.g., on Facebook, I urge you to view the original post including the links at http://bokunenjin.dreamwidth.org/62030.html

Living somewhat close to Baltimore and claiming to support social justice, I've felt a certain amount of guilt for not taking part in the recent protests. (I do support the protesters; I just didn't carve out the time and energy.) But here's the thing: WHITE GUILT IS USELESS.

Following in the footsteps of Val and Leigh, I'm using some of my economic privilege to fight white supremacy in the wake of racist violence including, but not limited to, last week's Charleston church shooting and—more broadly—racial profiling, police brutality, mass incarceration of African-Americans, and the militarization of many U.S. police departments. Specifically, I've just donated $1000 toward anti-racist action. If, like me, you've benefited from white privilege and have the means to do so, I invite you to donate to these or similar groups fighting for racial justice.

I have donated $250 each to each of these organizations:

Baltimore Racial Justice Action is “an action-based organization grounded in collective analysis of structural racism and white privilege.” In addition to a supportive community and educational events, BRJA offers consulting and training to individuals and organizations that seek to become inclusive and equitable. Donate here. Contributions are tax-deductible.

The American Civil Liberties Union, which works on the fight for voting rights, against the infuriating school-to-prison pipeline, and on many other racial justice issues. Donate here. Donations to the ACLU are not tax-deductible or employer-matchable; if that matters to you, donate to the ACLU Foundation here.

We the Protesters works to “fulfill the democratic promise of our union, establish true and lasting justice, accord dignity and standing to everyone, center the humanity of oppressed people, promote the brightest future for our children, and secure the blessings of freedom for all black lives.” Donate via the PayPal button at the end of their homepage. Donations are not tax-deductible.

The Equal Justice Initiative works “to reform the criminal justice system, challenge poverty and the legacy of racial injustice, educate the public and policymakers, and create hope in marginalized communities.” Donate here. Donations are tax-deductible and eligible for employer matching.

Giving to any (or all!) of these organizations is a direct way to fight racism and white supremacy in the United States. Guilt is useless. Take action.

This entry was originally posted at http://bokunenjin.dreamwidth.org/62030.html.
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

preparing to burn

Thu, 2015-06-18 17:49
I haven't done a sumi temae (charcoal procedure) in over three years; like many a Midorikai alumnus, I miss it as we make do with electric heating elements under our iron kettles. Combustion isn't allowed in our keikoba, and proper charcoal is expensive and prone to break in shipping—many keikoba in Japan don't use charcoal on a daily basis for these reasons, though at Gakuen one wouldn't think of using anything else.

Gradually that urge to play with fire has been growing, and last month when [blogspot.com profile] fail-better-blog heated the water in the LA tea trailer using charcoal, even if it was just binchōtan, the seduction was complete.

I already have an electric benibachi furo, but it isn't convertible for use with real ash and charcoal. Step one: get a plain furo, ideally in a dōanburo shape for ease of (my) doing and (guests') seeing the ash form. The funny thing is that haigata, or ash formation, was one of my least favorite things to do in Gakuen. I feel like it took me forever to do each one, and I never really got the hang of it—mine looked lopsided, choppy, and overworked. It was a task I approached with anxiety, possibly because I didn't have a chance to practice outside of the evenings I was on duty to do it in preparation for the next day's jitsugi. Or rather, it didn't occur to me that I could make a chance; the men's dorm contained our Midorikai utensils and equipment, including extra furo, so a diligent classmate of mine quietly borrowed one of them and found some ash to practice haigata regularly in his dorm room.

my new iron brazier (tetsuburo 鉄風炉)Back in the present day, I lucked out in finding an inexpensive used iron furo I like in the shape I wanted for sale on ebay. It arrived yesterday. Not having worked with an iron furo that wasn't a tokiwa furo, I brushed up on the differences in things used with an iron furo versus a bronze or ceramic furo. I believe they're limited to using a shikigawara instead of shiki-ita and using a red maegawara instead of a white one. Am I missing anything? I understand that furo made of iron are informal, or sō 草, in the shin-gyō-sō 真行草 scheme, which isn't surprising at all given my taste. I wonder whether that will limit the utensils I can use with it in my toriawase, or whether it can be placed on nagaita or daisu.

Starting with just the items that go in or under the furo, along with charcoal I'll need a shikigawara, ash, gotoku, maegawara, sokogawara, and hōshogami. I've been wondering what the purpose of lining the bottom of the furo with hōshogami is. Is it to cushion the unglazed ceramic sokogawara from the hard surface of the furo? Is it largely symbolic like the hōshogami in hōraikazari, providing a clean, pure base for the things on it?

This entry was originally posted at http://bokunenjin.dreamwidth.org/61551.html.
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers