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Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph's public journal about Linux, sysadmining, beer, travel, pink gadgets and her life in the city where little cable cars climb halfway to the stars.
Updated: 6 hours 33 min ago

Simcoe’s March 2015 Checkup

Sat, 2015-03-28 02:07

Our little Siamese, Simcoe, has Chronic Renal Failure (CRF). She has been doing well for over 3 years now with subcutaneous fluid injections every other day to keep her hydrated and quarterly check-ins with the vet to make sure her key blood levels and weight are staying within safe parameters.

On March 14th she went in for her latest visit and round of blood work. As usual, she wasn’t thrilled about the visit and worked hard to stay in her carrier the whole time.

She came out long enough for the exam, and the doctor was healthy with her physical, though her weight had dropped a little again, going from 9.74lbs to 9.54lbs.

Both her BUN and CRE levels remained steady.

Unfortunately her Calcium levels continue to come back a bit high, so the vet wants her in for an ionized Calicum test. She has explained that it’s only the ionized Calcium that is a concern because it can build up in the kidneys and lead to more rapid deterioration, so we’d want to get her on something to reduce the risk if that was the case. We’ll probably be making an appointment once I return from my travels in mid April to get this test done.

In the meantime, she gets to stay at home and enjoy a good book.

…my good book.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

The spaces between

Sat, 2015-03-28 01:58

It’s been over 2 months since I’ve done a “miscellaneous life stuff” blog post. Anyone reading this blog recently might think I only write about travel and events! Since that last post I have had other things pop up here and there, but I am definitely doing too many events. That should calm down a bit in the 2nd quarter of the year and almost disappear in the third, with the notable exception of a trip to Peru, part work and part pleasure.

Unfortunately it looks like stress I mentioned in that last post flipped the switch on my already increasing-in-frequency migraines. I’ve seen my neurologist twice this year and we’ve worked through several medications, finally finding one that seems to work. And at least a visit to my neurologist affords me some nice views.

So I have been working on stress reduction, part which is making sure I keep running. It doesn’t reduce stress immediately but a routine of exercise does help even me out in the long term. To help clear my head, I’ve also been refining my todo lists to make them more comprehensive. I’m also continuing to let projects go when I find they’re causing my stress levels to spike for little gain. This is probably the hardest thing to do, I care about everything I work on and I know some things will just drop on the ground if I don’t do them, but I really need to be more realistic about what I can actually get done and focus my energy accordingly.

And to clear the way in this post for happier things, I did struggle with the loss of Eric in January. My Ubuntu work here in San Francisco simply won’t be the same without him, and every time I start thinking about planning an event I am reminded that he won’t be around to help or attend. Shortly after learning of his passing, several of us met up at BerkeleyLUG to share memories. Then on March 18th a more organized event was put together to gather friends from his various spheres of influence to celebrate his life at one of his favorite local pizzerias. It was a great event, I met some really good people and saw several old friends. It also brought some closure for me that I’d been lacking in dealing with this on my own.

On to happier things! I actually spent 30 days in a row off a plane in March. Home time means I got to do lots of enjoyable home things, like actually spending time with my husband over some fantastic meals, as well as finally finishing watching Breaking Bad together. I also think I’ve managed to somewhat de-traumatize my cats, who haven’t been thrilled about all my travel. We’ve been able to take some time to do some “home things” – like get some painting estimates so we can get some repairs done around the condo. I also spent a day down in Mountain View so I could meet up with a local colleague who I hadn’t yet met to kick off a new project, and then have dinner with a friend who was in the area visiting. Plus, I got to see cool things like a rare storm colliding with a sunset one evening:

I’ve been writing some, in January my article 10 entry points to tech (for girls, women, and everyone) went live on opensource.com. In early March I was invited to publish an article on Tech Talk Live Blog on Five Ways to Get Involved with Ubuntu as an Educator based on experience working with teachers over the past several years. I’ve also continued work toward a new book in progress, which has been time-consuming but I’m hoping will be ready for more public discussion in the coming months. Mark G. Sobell’s A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux, 4th Edition also came out earlier this year, and while I didn’t write that, I did spend a nice chunk of time last summer doing review for it. I came away with a quote on the cover endorsing the great work Mark did with the book!

Work-wise, aside from travel and conferences I’ve talked about in previous posts, I was recently promoted to root and core for OpenStack Infrastructure. This has meant a tremendous amount to me, both the trust the team has placed in me and the increased ability for me to contribute to the infrastructure I’ve spent so much time with over these past couple of years. It also means I’ve been learning a lot and sorting through the tribal knowledge that should be formally documented. I was also able to participate as a Track Chair for selecting talks for the Related OSS Projects track at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver in May, I did this for Atlanta last year but ended up not being able to attend due to being too sick (stupid gallbladder). And while on the topic of Vancouver, a panel proposed by the Women of OpenStack that I’m participating in has been accepted, Standing Tall in the Room, where we hope to give other women in our community some tips for success. My next work trip is coming up before Vancouver I’m heading off to South Carolina for Posscon where I’ll be presenting on Tools for Open Source Systems Administration, a tour of tools we use in order to make collaborating online with a distributed team of systems administrators from various companies possible (and even fun!).

In the tech goodies department, I recently purchased a Nexus 6. I was compelled to after I dropped my Galaxy S3 while sitting up on the roof deck. I was pretty disappointed by the demise of my S3, it was a solid phone and the stress of replacement wasn’t something I was thrilled to deal with immediately upon my return from Oman. I did a bunch of research before I settled on the Nexus 6 and spent my hard-earned cash on retail price for a phone for the first time in my life. It’s now been almost a month and I’m still not quite used to how BIG the Nexus 6 is, but it is quite a pleasure to use. I still haven’t quite worked out how to carry it on my runs; it’s too big for my pockets and the arm band solution isn’t working (too bulky, and other reasons), I might switch to a small backpack that can carry water too. It’s a great phone though, so much faster than my old one, which honestly did deserve to be replaced, even if not in the way I face-planted it on the concrete, sorry S3.


Size difference: Old S3 in new Nexus 6 case

I also found my old Chumby while searching through the scary cave that is our storage unit for the paint that was used for previous condo painting. They’ve resurrected the service for a small monthly fee, now I just need to find a place to plug it in near my desk…

I actually made it out of the house to be social a little too. My cousin Steven McCorry is the lead singer in a band called Exotype, which signed a record deal last year and has since been on several tours. This one brought him to San Francisco, so I finally made my way out to the famous DNA Lounge to see the show. It was a lot of fun, but as much as I can appreciate metal, I’m pleased with their recent trend toward rock, which I prefer. It was also great to visit with my cousin and his band mates.

This week it was MJ’s turn to be out of the country for work. While I had Puppet Camp to keep me busy on Tuesday, I did a poor job of scheduling social engagements and it’s been a pretty lonely time. It gave me space to do some organization and get work done, but I wasn’t as productive as I really wanted to be and I may have binge watched the latest slew of Mad Men episodes that landed on Netflix one night. Was nice to have snuggle time with the kitties though.

MJ comes home Sunday afternoon, at which time we have to swap out the contents of his suitcase and head back to the airport to catch a red eye flight to Philadelphia. We’re spending next week moving a storage unit, organizing our new storage situation and making as many social calls as possible. I’m really looking forward to visiting PLUG on Wednesday to meet up with a bunch of my old Philadelphia Linux friends. And while I’m not actively looking forward to the move, it’s something we’ve needed to do for some time now, so it’ll be nice for that to be behind us.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Elastic{ON} 2015

Wed, 2015-03-18 22:58

I’m finally home for a month, so I’ve taken advantage of some of this time to attend and present at some local events. The first of which was Elastic{ON}, the first user conference for Elasticsearch and related projects now under the Elastic project umbrella. The conference venue was Pier 27, a cruise terminal on the bay. It was a beautiful venue with views of the bay, and clever use for a terminal while there aren’t ships coming in.

The conference kicked off with a keynote where they welcomed attendees (of which there were over 1300 from 35 countries!) and dove into project history from the first release in 2010. A tour of old logos and websites built up to the big announcement, the “Elastic” rebranding, as the scope of their work now goes beyond search in the former Elasticsearch name. The opening keynotes continued with several leads from projects within the Elastic family, including updates from Logstash and Kibana.

At lunch I ended up sitting with 3 other women who were attending the conference on behalf of their companies (when gender ratios are skewed, this type of congregation tends to happen naturally). We all got to share details about how we were using Elasticsearch, so that was a lot of fun. One woman was doing data analysis against it for her networking-related work, another was using it to store metadata for videos and the third was actually speaking that afternoon on how they’re using it to supplement the traditional earthquake data with social media data about earthquakes at the USGS.

Track sessions began after lunch, and I spent my afternoon camped out in the Demo Theater. The first talk was by the Elastic Director of Developer Relations, Leslie Hawthorne. She talked about the international trio of developer evangelists that she works with, focusing on their work to support and encourage meetup groups worldwide, noting that 75 cities now have meetups with a total of over 17,000 individual members. She shared some tips from successful meetup groups, including offering a 2nd track during meetups for beginners, using an unconference format rather than set schedule and mixing things up sometimes with hack nights on Elastic projects. It was interesting to learn how they track community metrics (code/development stats, plus IRC and mailing list activity) and she wrapped up by noting the new site at https://www.elastic.co/community where they’re working to add more how-tos and on-ramping content, which their recent acquisition of Found, which has maintained a lot of that kind of material.


Leslie Hawthorn on “State of the Community”

The next session was “Elasticsearch Data Journey: Life of a Document in Elasticsearch” by Alexander Reelsen & Boaz Leskes. When documents enter Elasticsearch as json output from a service like Logstash, it can seem like a bit of a black box as far as what exactly happens to it in order for it to be added to Elasticsearch. This talk went through what happens. It’s first stored in Elasticsearch, where it’s stored node-wise is based on several bits of criteria analyzed upon bringing in, and the data is normalized and sorted. While the data is coming in, it’s stored in a buffer and also written to a transaction log until it’s actually committed to disk, at which time it’s still in the transaction log until it can be replicated across the Elasticsearch cluster. From there, they went into discussing data retrieval, cluster scaling and while stressing that replication is NOT backups, how to actually do backups of each node and how to restore from them. Finally, they talked about the data deletion process and how it queues data for deletion on each node in segments and noted that this is not a reversible option.

Continuing in “Life of” theme, I also attended “Life of an Event in Logstash” by Colin Surprenant. Perhaps my favorite talk of the day, Colin did an excellent job of explaining and defining all the terms he used in his talk. Contrary to popular belief, this isn’t just useful to folks new to the project, but as a systems administrator who maintains dozens of different types of applications over hundreds of servers, I am not necessarily familiar with what Logstash in particular calls everything terminology-wise, so having it made clear during the talk was great. His talk walked us through the 3 stages that events coming into Logstash go through: Input, Filter and Output, and the sized queues between each of them. The Input stage takes whatever data you’re feeding into Logstash and uses plugins to transform it into a Logstash event. The Filter stage actually modifies the data from the event so that the data is made uniform. The Output stage translates the uniform data into whatever output you’re sending it to, whether it’s STDOUT or sending it off to Elastisearch as json. Knowing the bits of this system is really valuable for debugging loss of documents, I look forward to having the video online to share with my colleagues. EDIT 3/20/2015: Detailed slides online here.


Colin Surprenant on “Life of an Event in Logstash”

I tended to a avoid many of the talks by Elasticsearch users talking about how they use it. While I’m sure there’s valuable insights to be gained by learning how others use it, we’re pretty much convinced about our use and things are going well. So use cases were fresh to me when the day 2 keynotes kicked off with a discussion with Don Duet, Co-head of Technology at Goldman Sachs. It was interesting to learn that nearly 1/3 of the employees at Goldman Sachs are in engineering or working directly with engineering in some kind of technical analysis capacity. They were also framed as very tech-conscious company and long time open source advocate. In exploring some of their work with Elasticsearch he used legal documents as an example: previously they were difficult to search and find, but using Elasticsearch an engineer was empowered to work with the legal department to make the details about contracts and more searchable and easier to find.

The next keynote was a surprising one, from Microsoft! As a traditional proprietary, closed-source company, they haven’t historically been known for their support of open source software, at least in public. This has changed in recent years as the world around has changed and they’ve found themselves needing to not only support open source software in their stacks but contributing to things like the Linux kernel as well. Speaker Pablo Castro had a good sense of humor about this all as he walked attendees through three major examples of Elasticsearch use at Microsoft. It was fascinating to learn that it’s used for content on MSN.com, which gets 18 billion hits per month. They’re using Elasticsearch on the Microsoft Dynamics CRM for social media data, and in this case their actually using Ubuntu as well. Finally, they’re using it for the search tool in their cloud offering, Azure. They’ve come a long way!


Pablo Castro of Microsoft

The final keynote was from NASA JPL. The room was clearly full of space fans, so this was a popular presentation. They talked about how they use Elasticsearch to hold data about user behavior from browsers on internal sites so they can improve them for employees. They also noted the terribly common practice of putting data (in this case, for the Mars rover) into Excel or Powerpoint and emailing it around as a mechanism for data sharing, and how they’ve managed to get this data into Elasticsearch instead, clearly improving the experience for everyone.

After the keynotes, it time to do my presentation! The title of my talk was “elastic-Recheck Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself: How Elasticsearch Helps OpenStack QA” and I can’t take credit for the title, my boring title was replaced by a suggestion from the talk selection staff. The talk was fun, I walked through our use of Elasticsearch to power our elastic-recheck (status page, docs) tooling in OpenStack. It’s been valuable not only for developer feedback (“your patch failed tests because of $problem, not your code”), but by giving the QA an Infrastructure teams a much better view into what the fleet of test VMs are up to in the aggregate so we can fix problems more efficiently. Slides from my talk are here (pdf).


All set up for elastic-Recheck Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself

Following my talk, ended up having lunch with the excellent Carol Willing. We got to geek out on all kinds of topics from Python to clouds as we enjoyed an outdoor lunch by the bay. Until it started drizzling.

The most valuable talk in the afternoon for me was “Resiliency in Elasticsearch and Lucene” with Boaz Leskes & Igor Motov. They began by talking about how with scale came the realization that more attention needed to be paid to recovering from various types of failures, and that they show up more often when you have more workers. The talk walked through various failures scenarios and how they’ve worked (and are working) on making improvements in these areas, including “pulling the plug” for a full shutdown, various hard disk failures, data corruption, and several types of cluster and HA failures (splitbrain and otherwise), out of memory resiliency and external pressures. This is another one I’m really looking forward to the video from.

The event wrapped up with a panel from GuideStar, kCura and E*Trade on how they’re using Elasticsearch and several “war stories” from their experiences working with the software itself, open source in general and Elastic the company.

In all, the conference was a great experience for me, and it was an impressive inaugural conference, though perhaps I should have expected that given the expertise and experience of the community team they have working there! They plan on doing a second one, and I recommend attendance to folks working with Elasticsearch.

More of my photos from the conference here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/sets/72157650940379129/

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers