About LinuxChix Live

LinuxChix Live is a collection of weblog entries by members of LinuxChix.

LinuxChix Live is automatically generated from the RSS/Atom feeds of contributor's weblogs and includes personal, political and technical writing as they choose. All entries remain the copyright of the individual contributors.

If you would like your entries included, please contact us and tell us the URL of your RSS or Atom feed. Please use the Feed Validator to check your feed before sending it in.

WutheringBytes 2014 Talk – Linux Bootloaders and Kernel Config

Melanie Rhianna Lewis - Sat, 2014-08-16 10:15

BootingLoadersTitle

Here are the slides to the Loaders talk I gave at Wuthering Bytes 2014 at Hebden Bridge, here in the UK.

http://www.cyberspice.org.uk/downloads/BootingLoaders.pdf

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

WutheringBytes 2014 Talk – Linux Bootloaders and Kernel Config

Melanie Rhianna Lewis - Sat, 2014-08-16 10:13

BootingLoadersTitle

Here are the slides to the Loaders talk I gave at Wuthering Bytes 2014 at Hebden Bridge, here in the UK.

http://www.cyberspice.org.uk/downloads/BootingLoaders.pdf

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

[Book Reviews] "Why Everyone (Else) Is A Hypocrite: Evolution and the Modular Mind"

Raven - Fri, 2014-08-15 15:59
It probably says something about me that I had already read about every study cited in Robert Kurzban's pop science work "Why Everyone (Else) Is A Hypocrite: Evolution and the Modular Mind" and all of the philosophers, but 75% of his movie references were lost upon me. I fail at pop. (Pretty funny, since that's what most of the Amazon reviewers loved about the book.) I was predisposed to like his book, though, because his thesis of the complexity/multiplicity of mind pretty much tallies with my own experience of consciousness. Briefly, he posits that we are not each one solitary controlled actor, but rather each a collection of competing and cooperating neural responses and cognitive processes (he refers to these as modules of the brain) which don't necessarily share information with each other. So we aren't always (or even often) consciously aware that we have done something (heart beating, breathing, etc.), or how we have done it (detectable decision making is not the first neural activity associated with that decision) or, most crucially, why we have done it. He tackles confabulation and split-brain patients, touching on the work of my favorite neurologist V.S. Ramachandran, and then extends this thinking to other neural processes that aren't strictly hemisphere-limited.

The central useful idea of the book discusses cases where we simultaneously hold two conflicting ideas, and explains this as different modules of the brain being adapted for different purposes. That certainly happens and has clear ties to Ramachandran's split-brain work, and when asked how we resolve these seemingly conflicting pieces of information, we usually just make shit up (technical term: confabulation). He explains our brains as adapted for living as social animals, and so one module (he calls it the press secretary) has as its function the favorable presentation of ourselves to others. If this were true, it would sometimes be to our advantage for that module to be strategically ignorant of other things we do or think, much as politicians tend to deny knowledge of whatever inconveniently unpopular thing is advancing their agenda. So in Kurzban's framing, the self-interested modules that are pursuing our own advantage simply don't inform the press secretary module of this, and this explains why you get family values politicians having affairs, Eliot Spitzer, etc. (He didn't reference the GLBT versions thereof, I suspect because some readers will think that's a harder evolutionary sell than het sex.) The thing I would have loved to see discussed that didn't get covered is how these various brain modules arrive at a decision when there is conflict between them. I suspect that the answer is "Nobody knows!", but he spends so much time debunking the little-decider-brain-within-a-big-brain approach that I felt like he owed the reader an alternate hypothesis for how this decision making actually happens, or at least an admission that we haven't the faintest idea.

Kurzban is a straight-up materialist and nothing else is considered, just referenced as history... he comes within a hair of titling a section "Why Your Religion Is Wrong And There Is Nothing But The Brain". But if that doesn't bother you or if you agree with him, you'll probably like this book. I think he's too exclusionary there -- even if you're a materialist too, he doesn't reference or look at the known effects of digestive bacteria on mood or neural activity, for example, and only kinda touches on the substantial body of literature on hormones and their expressions. When you're writing a 220 page book I can kind of understand not wanting to open those cans of E. coli, though. I appreciated his clear delineation of the differences in playing a game against other humans (where you may win via persuasion even if you are wrong) versus playing a game against nature (honey badger don't care about your press secretary) and the cases where that does and doesn't work out for people. But I do think it would do most of us good to be able to think of ourselves more as ecosystems rather than as singly motivated beings... we pretty clearly are. I have found it cognitively useful when thrashing through a complicated problem to not kick myself for "Why do I hold both A and in-this-case not-A?" -- realizing that it's a case of dual inputs which happen to conflict rather than "you suck at logical consistency" helps me figure out what I'm actually going to do. I didn't learn a lot from reading this book -- the one new-information takeaway that I got from it was that Stephen Jay Gould attributed ideas his fellow evolutionists never held to them just so that he could "debunk" them. Pretty annoying to have someone try to prove to you adversarially your own position! Heh. "Gould's strategic errors, painting himself a defender of a completely sensible view in opposition to views held by no one, was thoroughly effective. He died famous, wealthy, and wrong." Dang. (Stephen Jay Gould was one of my childhood heroes; I was reading and loving his books about the time that all this was going on in academia.)

Four monogamy-policing nesting birds out of five.

This entry was originally posted at http://ivy.dreamwidth.org/403612.html and has comment count unavailable comments there. Please feel free to comment on either site; comments rock.
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Back from defcon!

Terri - Fri, 2014-08-15 07:37
Back from defcon. Almost recovered from con crud.

Defcon is a con that doesn't have a great rep among women, so I'd given it a miss despite being curious until I'd collected a posse. It worked out well.

I was expecting the exhaustion, the chaos, but I wasn't expecting to feel artistically inspired.

I spent hours searching for a robot army and, when I found it, the robots danced with me.

I went to an elevator talk which wasn't about pitching to CEOs but was rather about hacking elevators. All other elevator talks are going to be disappointing now, but elevators are going to be more interesting.

I played a game that started with soldering a badge and meeting strangers that somehow plunged me into a little augmented reality that I was desperate to see more of.

I designed a t-shirt that a whole bunch of people wore, and more people asked me where to buy one.

I discovered that casinos are pretty much all the migraine triggers at once and that as a result it was sometimes more relaxing being on the con floor than leaving it.

I talked about teaching and learning through games. I learned a few things through a game, including that there are still times where my desire to make games is much greater than my desire to play them.

I wish I'd gone sooner, but suspect I also made the right choice by waiting until I had backup.

I came home with a head full of things I wanted to build... and also full of congestion and mucus so it hurt too much to do anything.

... but I got back to building a game today, so maybe I'll get some of these other grand plans in motion too.

comment count unavailable comments

Ditch Agile, Go With Common Sense

L J Laubenheimer (Iconoclast Blast) - Tue, 2014-07-15 17:40
I am so sick of Agile I could puke. Agile "methods" and "processes" are often used as a bludgeon to enforce the great speedup, doing more, faster, with fewer resources. I see estimations forced into the PM or manager's demanded hard deadline, hours getting longer because of wasted time in meetings, and "rapid" deployment of garbage code that needs to be rolled back because no integration testing was done (eliminating QA does that to you.)
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

How To ***REALLY*** Advocate for the Customer

L J Laubenheimer (Iconoclast Blast) - Tue, 2014-07-15 17:32
I occasionally see job ads for "customer advocates" or "customer evangelists". They all turn out to be sales and marketing, that is, advocating or evangelizing stuff to the would-be user. That is so ass-backwards that it makes me foam at the mouth.
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Haecksen organisers mailing list

Oceania Women of Open Tech - Mon, 2014-05-26 03:54

With OWOOT closing, the OWOOT list will no longer be available to volunteers organising the Haecksen miniconference at linux.conf.au.

If you're interested in helping out with Haecksen in future years, please join the new Haecksen organisers mailing list hosted by Linux Australia.

Categories: News about LinuxChix

OWOOT to close

Oceania Women of Open Tech - Mon, 2014-05-26 00:29

Unfortunately, the OWOOT list members have agreed that there is not enough interest amongst our members to continue OWOOT as an organisation. Over the next few days, this website will close.

The Haecksen miniconf will continue to run at linux.conf.au for as long as there is interest, we've requested a separate organisers be established for this.

Those interested in receiving news of open source technical events in Australia should join the Linux Australia announcement list. Those interested in in-person meetups of technical women can consider Girl Geek Sydney, Girl Geek Dinners Melbourne, Girl Geek Dinners Brisbane, Wellington Girl Geek Dinners, or Auckland Girl Geek Dinners; or look for a Girl Geek Coffees group.

OWOOT grew out of LinuxChix Sydney and Melbourne chapters founded by Julie Gibson and Alex Bayley respectively. After the founding of the LinuxChix (now Haecksen) miniconf at linux.conf.au 2007, AussieChix and New Zealand LinuxChix were founded, and both merged into OWOOT in 2011. Thank you to the many key volunteers for these groups over the years.

Categories: News about LinuxChix

SCaLE 12x Pics From Around the Web!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Los Angeles Chapter - Fri, 2014-03-14 23:14
The Tres Chix rocked it @ SCaLE 12x!!!!

The Tres Chix rocked it @ SCaLE 12x!!!!
Picture From the SCALE 12x Official Pics Site
https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=scale12x&s=rec

We won!!!! by Phillip Banks!

We won “Biggest SCaLE Spirit” and “Best Crowd Pleaser” Awards @ SCaLE 12x!  We won!  We won!!  We won!!!
Picture by Phillip Banks

And we got our own hashtag on Instagram thanks to TrueAbility!

Thomas Stocking ‏@ThomasStocking Feb 22 Expo has plenty of life for open source software geeks like me at #scale12x pic.twitter.com/3pXObnsF6p

Thomas Stocking ‏@ThomasStocking Feb 22
Expo has plenty of life for open source software geeks like me at #scale12x pic.twitter.com/3pXObnsF6p

 

A penguin on the loose at #scale12x pic.twitter.com/1Djo0ckPy3

A penguin on the loose at #scale12x pic.twitter.com/1Djo0ckPy3

 

randalschwartz 3 weeks ago · SCaLE 12x Audience for my talk at #scale12x

Audience for my talk at #scale12x
randal-schwartz

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

#New project problems

Brianna Laugher - Sat, 2014-02-22 23:21

I-know-how-to-program wankery (get to the content already)

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

New project: Crowdfunded Free Software (CFFSW)

Brianna Laugher - Wed, 2014-02-19 12:27

The launch of a new blog, which aims to chronicle crowdfunding campaigns for free software and related endeavours.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Some Newsblur fangirling

Brianna Laugher - Tue, 2014-02-11 06:19

Notes on customising your Newsblur shared items page, intelligence training and the Android app.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

What will we count?

What Will We Use? (Maco and Bethlynn) - Wed, 2012-03-21 18:39

Hello Readers…

This blog has been about Microsoft and its market share.

Specifically, on June 2009 I bet my friend Nick that Microsoft would lack a majority market share come June 2011. We discussed the three products that HAD the majority market share as of the summer of 2009:

  1. Microsoft Internet Explorer for browsers
  2. Microsoft Office for office suites
  3. Microsoft Windows for operating systems

Due to personal reasons, we did not conclude this project properly.

It was too time intensive to research the true market share of Microsoft products. It is without question that Microsoft no longer holds the majority market share on browsers, now with about 30% of the market share. The office suite question is still under debate due to Google Apps. Also under consideration is if tablets replace the desktop.

In summary, the question all along should have been “What will we count?” as office suites and operating system platforms instead of “What will we use?”

Without question, Microsoft is struggling to stay relevant as revenues plummet. Indeed, upon 2011 year close Microsoft is a different company. It is sad. I do not want Microsoft to fold. Competition is good even for the Apple and Linux-based products I prefer using.

After-all, I am a MSFT stock-holder.

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Ramadan Mubarak

Lilandra - Sat, 2011-08-13 05:10

Ramadan is here again. Actually we are about 13 days in…so almost half way done.

And you’re wondering what could I possibly doing that is new, right?
More pictures of dates and fried stuff?
An artistic shot of a glass of water?

Well I intend to host my very first Iftar.

I’m going to give people food to break fast.

Now my mom is not very happy about this.
She may not like the menu either.

But I had a plan…for how I could cook everything…bake bake bake…I really need a second oven…

However I was saved. I am outsourcing the meat and one side.

I am making one side and salad (well I informed my sister in law that she is making the salad).

I’m excited and petrified at the same time.

Wsh me luck!

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Transmissions from 2011-06-26

Teri Solow - Sun, 2011-06-26 12:50
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

gothiccharmschool: I don’t care if Monday’s blueTuesday’s gray…

Teri Solow - Sat, 2011-06-25 21:00

gothiccharmschool:

I don’t care if Monday’s blue
Tuesday’s gray and Wednesday too
Thursday I don’t care about you
It’s Friday, I’m in love

Monday you can fall apart
Tuesday, Wednesday break my heart
Oh, Thursday doesn’t even start
It’s Friday I’m in love

I don’t care if Mondays black
Tuesday, Wednesday – heart attack
Thursday, never looking back
It’s Friday, I’m in love

Monday, you can hold your head
Tuesday, Wednesday stay in bed
Or Thursday – watch the walls instead
It’s Friday, I’m in love

Via l0vechild

Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Transmissions from 2011-06-25

Teri Solow - Sat, 2011-06-25 12:50
  • One placeholder sentence to replace and I guess I'm ready to figure out this deploy. But, oh, what a sentence. #
  • @travisezell Oh man, he had such a cute little website and now it's contemplating sympathy death. http://bit.ly/kXiWQu in reply to travisezell #
  • Procrastination is a muse and the paradox. @ Reed College – Educational Technology Center http://instagr.am/p/GTxqY/ #
  • Taking my cats to the vet just now was my $500 nam. Seriously, the wisdom tooth extraction Monday was way cheaper and slightly more pleasant #
  • To be clear, the vets were great. It was the screaming murderous cats which were the problem. #
  • @palomint You're supposed to tell us. in reply to palomint #
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers

Transmissions from 2011-06-24

Teri Solow - Sat, 2011-06-25 05:50
  • One placeholder sentence to replace and I guess I'm ready to figure out this deploy. But, oh, what a sentence. #
  • @travisezell Oh man, he had such a cute little website and now it's contemplating sympathy death. http://bit.ly/kXiWQu in reply to travisezell #
  • Procrastination is a muse and the paradox. @ Reed College – Educational Technology Center http://instagr.am/p/GTxqY/ #
  • Taking my cats to the vet just now was my $500 nam. Seriously, the wisdom tooth extraction Monday was way cheaper and slightly more pleasant #
  • To be clear, the vets were great. It was the screaming murderous cats which were the problem. #
  • @palomint You're supposed to tell us. in reply to palomint #
Categories: LinuxChix bloggers
Syndicate content